Huntington’s Disease Society of America Announces Premiere for Juvenile Huntington’s Disease Documentary

For Immediate Release
Contact: Christopher Cosentino
Director of Marketing & Communications
Phone: (212) 242-1968 x229
Email: ccosentino@hdsa.org

Her Mother’s Daughter to Premiere in New York City on May 11th

New York, NY (February 28, 2017) – The Huntington’s Disease Society of America (HDSA) is proud to announce the world premiere of the powerful documentary Her Mother’s Daughter on Thursday, May 11th at the NYIT Auditorium on Broadway in New York City. The film was directed by Rae Maxwell and produced by HDSA.

Filmmaker Rae Maxwell introduces the world to Kathi O’Donnell and shows the devastating impact that Huntington’s disease (HD) and juvenile Huntington’s disease (JHD) has had on the O’Donnell family. The film is a window into Kathi’s inspiring journey as a caregiver as we see the different stages of HD and JHD – a rare form of HD that progresses more rapidly than adult onset.

Her Mother’s Daughter shines a much-needed light on juvenile Huntington’s disease and the impact that HD has on families,” said Louise Vetter HDSA CEO. “The film is a raw portrait of this terrible disease that helps build an understanding of HD, but it is also a tribute to the strength of caregivers and the true meaning of family.”

To reserve your seat at the world premiere of Her Mother’s Daughter in New York City please visit HDSA.org/HMDFilm. There is no cost to attend and seats are limited. The premiere will feature a pre-show reception with light food and beverages. There will also be a Q & A session after the showing.

Huntington’s disease is a fatal genetic disorder that causes the progressive breakdown of nerve cells in the brain and has no cure. Every child of a parent with HD has a 50/50 chance of inheriting the faulty gene that causes the disease. Today, there are approximately 30,000 symptomatic Americans and more than 200,000 at-risk of inheriting this rare disease. Less than 10 percent of all HD cases are diagnosed before the age of 20. Juvenile Huntington’s disease typically progresses more rapidly than adult onset HD.

The symptoms of HD are described as having ALS, Parkinson’s & Alzheimer’s – simultaneously.

The Huntington’s Disease Society of America is the premier nonprofit organization dedicated to improving the lives of everyone affected by HD.  From community services and education to advocacy and research, HDSA is the world’s leader in providing help for today, hope for tomorrow for people with HD and their families.

To learn more about Huntington’s disease and the work of the Huntington’s Disease Society of America, visit www.hdsa.org or call (800) 345-HDSA.

 

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